Important GIT Terminology For Developers

Coders all around the world in different industries make use of a GIT version control system in some form whether it is Github or an on-premise version control system like Gitlab. There are important terminologies that come along with GIT and today we are going to look at exactly that terminology.

Branch

A branch is a version of the repository that diverges from the main working project.

Checkout

Git checkout is used to switch between branches in a repository where git checkout master switches you back to the master branch.

Cherry Picking

Cherry-picking in Git is meant to apply some commit from one branch into another branch.

Clone

Git clone is used to make a copy of the target repository to your local system.

Fetch

Fetching is used to fetch branches and tags from one or more different repositories, along with the objects necessary to complete their histories.

Head

Head is the representation of the last commit in the current checkout branch. We can think of the head like the current branch.

Origin

Origin is used instead of the original repository URL to make referencing much easier.

Pull

The term pull is used to receive updated data from your GIT version control system like Github for example. It fetches and merges changes on the remote server to your working directory.

Push

Pushing changes from your local repository to the remote repository.

Index

Git index is a staging area between the working directory and repository. It is used as the index to build up a set of changes that you want to commit together.

Master

Master is the naming convention for the main working branch of the repository. When making changes to branches you can merge it to the Main/Master branch.

Merge

To merge your changes from a branch into the master branch in most cases.

Remote

The term remote in GIT is concerned with the remote repository. It is the shared repository that all team members use to exchange their changes.

Repository

The repository contains the collection of files as well as the history of the changes made to those files. Repositories in GIT are considered your project folder.

Git Fork

A fork is a copy of the original repository and creating a newly forked repository. It allows you to freely test and debug with changes without affecting the original project.

If I missed a term in the terminology above please feel free to drop a comment in the comment section below.

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Chad Crouch

Chad is a Software/DevOps Engineer with exposure and experience in various technologies and enterprise ICT environments. He has a huge passion for Technologies, specifically Linux and Open Source Software. If you enjoy our articles please support us and make a small contribution: Buy Us A Coffee